Difference between revisions of "Amerindians and Inuit"

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* [http://www.autochtones.gouv.qc.ca/index_en.asp Secretariat aux affaires autochtones]
 
* [http://www.autochtones.gouv.qc.ca/index_en.asp Secretariat aux affaires autochtones]
* [http://www.mrn.gouv.qc.ca/autochtones/english/ Maps of the aboriginal communities of Quebec]
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* [http://www.saa.gouv.qc.ca/nations/cartes_communautes_en.htm Maps of the aboriginal communities of Quebec]
  
 
In 1985, by a resolution of the National Assembly, the Parliament of Québec recognized the existence of aboriginal nations within Quebec's territory. In virtue of the resolution, the National Assembly recognized:
 
In 1985, by a resolution of the National Assembly, the Parliament of Québec recognized the existence of aboriginal nations within Quebec's territory. In virtue of the resolution, the National Assembly recognized:

Latest revision as of 01:45, 22 November 2010

At present, the 10 Amerindian nations and the Inuit nation, totalling some 70,000 inhabitants, account for approximately 1% of Québec's population.

General

Governments

Federal

Québec

Note: Indian affairs is a federal jurisdiction in Canada.

In 1985, by a resolution of the National Assembly, the Parliament of Québec recognized the existence of aboriginal nations within Quebec's territory. In virtue of the resolution, the National Assembly recognized:

  1. the right of the aboriginal peoples to autonomy in Québec;
  2. the right to their culture, language and traditions;
  3. the right to own and control land, the right to hunt, fish, harvest;
  4. the right to participate in the management of wildlife resources;
  5. the right to participate in the economic development of Québec and to benefit from such development.

That framework was used for the negotiation of various agreements ever since:

Native

Inuit

Abenakis

Algonquins

Attikameks

Crees

Wendat

Malecites

Micmacs

Mohawks

Innu