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'''''Secondly''''', -- Would it please the ''Canadiens'' that be restored, in the courts of justice of the province, the right to have [[Wikipedia:juror|jurors]] decide the facts that would be disputed between the litigating parties in [[Wikipedia:Civil Code of Quebec|civil matters]], if the parties, or one of them required it, as it was in the province from September 1764, up until May first, 1775, when the [[Wikipedia:Quebec Act|Act of the Parliament of the year 1774]], for the establishment of the government of this province, began to take force? -- And, if jurors were restored in civil matters, would be it please the ''Canadiens'', that while giving their reports, or verdicts, on the matters submitted to their decision, one required that they be, all twelve, unanimous, or rather than they claim to be so; or would it be more pleasant to the ''Canadiens'' than the decision of nine jurors, who would agree, out of the twelve, be considered sufficient to decide the matter in question according to their feeling, in spite of the opposition of the others three jurors? -- And, moreover, would it be pleasant to the ''Canadiens'' that jurors be paid by the litigating parties, or by the party which would require it, a moderate sum, like one [[Wikipedia:Piastre|Spanish piastre]] each, or half a piastre, to reward them for the time and attention which they would be obliged to give to these decisions?
'''''Thirdly''''', -- Would it please the ''Canadiens'', that, in order to have the members of the [[Wikipedia:Legislative Council of Quebec|Legislative Council]] of the province act with more liberty and zeal for the good of the province, and to make them more respectable to the eyes of the other inhabitants of the province, it be ordered in the least ambiguous and most solemn way, by an act of the Parliament, that the governor does not have the power to dismiss any member of that council from his office of adviser, or even to suspend any member for a time, however short it may be, without the assent of four fifth of the members of the council, i.e. if they were twenty advisers, then sixteen among these twenties; and, in all cases, if the advisers were less than the number of fifteen, without the assent of at least twelve advisers; which assent from the advisers who would join the governor in suspending one of their fellow-members, would be signed of their hand on the registers of the council, and also on another copy that would be given to the suspended person. Always provided that the King Himself preserved the power to dismiss such adviser that he would like, when it would seem good to Him, or by an act made in His private council, or by an order signed by His hand, and contresigned by the Secretary of State.
'''''Fourthly''''', -- Would it please the ''Canadiens'', that, to render the judges of the province more courageous in administering justice with impartiality, it be ordered by an act of Parliament, that none of them be removable of his office of judge by the governor of the province, under whatever pretext it may be; and also that the governor should not have the power to suspend any one of them for more than a year, nor for this amount time, or any amount time, whatever short it may be, without the assent of at least twelve members of the legislative council of the province, signed by their hands on the registers of the council, and also on another copy which would be given to the suspended judge: Always provided that the King Himself keep the power to dismiss any judge He would like, when it would seem good to Him, or by an act made in His private council, or by an order signed by His hand, and contresigned by the Secretary of State.
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